HOME

Name: margalit
Location: Massachusetts, United States Professional writer, educational advocate, opinionated ultra liberal mother of 18 year old twins, living life in the slow lane due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, and diabetes.

email: margalitc at yahoo dot com

View My Complete Profile

My Amazon.com Wish List

Rate this Blog at Blogged

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

PanHandling!

Photobucket

Alltop, confirmation that we kick ass



Powered by FeedBlitz

Subscribe with Bloglines

Blog Search: The Source for Blogs

Add to Technorati Favorites

Digg!

Powered by Blogger

Tuesday, October 21, 2008

WFMW: Carpet care hints

When we lived in CA our house was carpeted with beige carpeting. It was almost impossible to keep clean, but during our years there I learned some trick of the trade for dealing with carpeting stains, accidents and kid screw-ups.

Removing candle wax on carpeting.

First, remove as much of the wax as you can by hand after it has dried. Then place a piece of brown paper bag over the wax in the area you want to clean and go over it with a warm iron. Keep the iron moving, and move the paper often. The heat from the iron melts the wax, and the brown paper wicks the wax OUT of the carpet. Repeat until it is gone. I have seen red wax completely removed from very light colored carpet this way..not trace of the wax remained.

Spot cleaning

Spot cleaning a carpet is good. It keeps the carpet looking good until you have time to call a professional to do the job. Remember, carpet manufactures recommend having your carpets professionally steam cleaned at least once a year. Twice if you soil them frequently. Cleaning your carpet too often can hurt your carpet and shorten it’s life-span. One of the problems that professionals come across is when homeowners clean their carpet themselves and leave behind a terrible residue in the carpet. This is especially true when using certain name brand carpet spot removers. These products leave a residue that temporarily leaves the spot looking good and giving you a false sense of satisfaction for a job well done. However, within a few weeks or even days, the spot is replaced with a grayish-blackish spot the continues to collect more dirt as the spot has traffic over it. When these spots are rinsed out, it leaves a residue that is worse than the original spot. One other item to note, keep in mind before you start spilling things on that stain - you may do more damage and end up costing yourself more money than if you just simply called a professional.

Removing Blood Stains

Blot with a white paper towel to remove as much of the blood stain that you can. Next, neutralize by spraying the stain with a solution of 1/2 cup cool water and 1 Tbsp. of clear ammonia. (do not wet backing!) Blot to remove excess moisture. (use a white paper towel for blotting) Then spray on a solution made with 1 qt. cool water and 1/4 tsp. of dish detergent. (not containing bleach or lanolin) Joy or Dawn are good. Blotting to work the solution into the area. Continue if you see the spot being removed. Now, use a spray bottle filled with cool water to rinse. Then apply a 'pad' of paper towels and place a brick or heavy book on top to absorb the moisture. If all of the stain does not come out, moisten the ends of the fabric with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide. Let stand for 1 hour. Blot and repeat until carpet is stain free. Repeat the brick to absorb moisture.

Removing water soluble and grease stains

This tip works for almost all water soluble or grease stains. Spray the area with an ammonia and water mix (50-50) that has a few drops of liquid soap added for increased "wetability". Do not allow the fluid to sit more than a few seconds and then use a shop vacuum that is rated for wet use (very important) and suck up the stain. Repeat until the stain is gone and then vacuum the area that was wet until it is almost dry. This sounds like it takes a long time but if the solution is left in a spray bottle and the vacuum is readily available, it only takes 5 minutes. The use of the vacuum is important as ALL of the normal spray "washes" that appear to remove the stain simply drive the stain deeper into the carpet where it can't be seen for a while. The above process mimics the professional carpet cleaner process and actually removes the stain.

Removing nail polish

Get some non-acetone nail polish remover that has no fragrance or color added. Next, take a white cloth or paper towel and dip in the remover. Now test on a hidden part of the carpet (corner of a closet or a remnant) by blotting on the carpet. If color transfers to the cloth or the fabric 'melts', contact a carpet care professional. If your carpet is color safe, apply the remover to a white cloth and blot (do not rub) the stained area. This may take some time. Just keep blotting until the stain is gone. If the stain remains, make a solution of 1 teaspoon of dish washing liquild and 1 quart of warm water. Apply with enough of the solution to cover the stain and let soak for 5 minutes. Blot the excess moisture and rinse with warm water. Blot thoroughly with a clean cloth. If the stain reappears after drying, repeat.

Removing Gum

Put a spoon of peanut-butter on the gum. Use the spoon to mix it into the gum and then let it sit for just a couple minutes. Then rub with the spoon to loosen it. Take a wet rag and wipe it up in sort of a picking motion. Next take a rag and wash the spot. This really works!

Removing lipstick

I realized that lipstick has petroleum jelly in it, so I rubbed some Vaseline into the lipstick stain on my carpet and it disappeared. Just rub the petroleum jelly into the stain well with your fingers. Then scrape the jelly up with a paint scraper or butter knife. Then use Dawn dish soap and warm water to clean up the rest of what is left behind. You may have to repeat the Vaseline step, depending on how much lipstick is in the carpet.

Labels: ,

Digg! Stumble It! JBlog Me add to kirtsy

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Copyright, 2003-2011 by Animzmirot Design Group. All rights reserved. No part of this blog may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval without written permission from Margalit, the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review. In other words, stealing is bad, and if you take what doesn't belong to you, it's YOUR karma.